My Blog

Posts for: September, 2014

By Garner Family Dentistry
September 23, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
Top5ReasonsNottoDelayGettingaRootCanal

So you came in to the dental office for an exam, and now you’ve been told you need a root canal. But you’re wondering: Do I really have to do this? I’ve heard all sorts of things about the procedure. What if I wait a while — would that be so bad?

The answer is: It just might! Whenever we dentists recommend a root canal procedure, we have good reasons for doing so. Here are the top five reasons why you shouldn’t delay getting this important treatment.

  1. The tooth is infected and dying; a root canal stops the infection. While the outer layers of the tooth are hard, the inner pulp is made of soft, living tissue. This tissue sometimes becomes infected (through deep decay, cracks in the tooth surface, etc.), and begins to die. Once that happens, treatment is needed right away — to stop the pain, control the infection, and keep it from spreading.
  2. Root Canal Treatment Alleviates Pain. That’s right: Root canal treatment doesn’t cause pain — it relieves it. The procedure is relatively painless, despite the old stories you might have heard. In fact, it’s not unlike having a cavity treated, though it may take a little longer. So if you’re experiencing tooth pain (a major symptom in most cases of root canal trouble), remember that the sooner you get it treated, the sooner you’ll be pain-free.
  3. It won’t get better on its own… If you ignore some things, they will go away. Root canal problems aren’t one of those things. In some cases, if you wait long enough, the pain will go away. But that’s not a good sign, because the problem won’t go away on its own; it simply means that the nerves inside the tooth are all dead. The infection continues to smolder like glowing coals in a fire.
  4. …But it could get worse. Left untreated, bacteria from the infected tooth pulp can travel through the roots of the tooth and into the tissue of the gums and jaw. That can cause a painful, pus-filled abscess to form, which will require urgent treatment. In extreme cases, It can also result in increasing systemic (whole-body) inflammation, potentially putting you at risk for more serious conditions, like heart disease and stroke.
  5. Root Canal Treatment Can Save the Tooth. If you neglect treatment of a root canal problem long enough, you’re at serious risk for losing the infected tooth. And tooth loss, once it starts, can bring on a host of other problems — like an increased risk of tooth decay on remaining teeth, as well as gum disease, bite problems… and, as oral health problems escalate, even more tooth loss. Why put yourself at risk?

If you would like more information about root canal treatment, call our office for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “A Step-By-Step Guide To Root Canal Treatment” and “Tooth Pain? Don’t Wait!


By Garner Family Dentistry
September 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
IronChefCatCoraProtectingYourChildrensTeethStartsEarly

When Cat Cora is not doing battle as the first female chef on the Food Network's hit series Iron Chef America, she is busy caring for the needs of her four active young sons. This includes monitoring the food they eat and their oral hygiene habits.

The busy chef, restaurateur, author, philanthropist and television personality recently revealed in an interview with Dear Doctor magazine that it all started when her four sons were little. She got rid of bottles and sippy cups as soon as possible to prevent tooth decay. She also started exposing her boys to a wide variety of spices and foods when they were infants — for example, by putting cinnamon in their baby cereal. Cat limits the amount of sugar in their diet by using fruit puree in baked goods and BBQ sauces, or the natural sugar substitute Stevia. Furthermore, Cat reports, “my kids have never had fast food.”

Cat is right on target with her approach to her children's oral health. In fact, we are often asked, when is the right time to schedule a child's first dental appointment? Our answer surprises some people — especially those expecting their first child.

The ideal time to take your child to the dentist is around age 1. Why so young? A baby's first visit to the dentist sets the stage for lifelong oral health. Besides, tooth decay can start very early. Baby Bottle Tooth Decay (BBTD), as the name suggests, impacts children who often go to sleep sipping a bottle filled with a liquid containing natural or added sugars, such as formula, fruit juice or a fruity drink mix. Another condition, Early Childhood Caries (ECC), is often found in children who continuously use sippy cups (again, filled with sugary liquids), children who breast feed at will throughout the night, children who use a sweetened pacifier, and children who regularly take sugar-based oral medicine to treat chronic illness.

To learn more about this topic, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Age One Dental Visit.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment. And to read the entire interview with Cat Cora, please see the article “Cat Cora.”